Urban Girl Mag | 5 Touches of Black Culture Integrated with in the Royal Wedding
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5 Touches of Black Culture Integrated with in the Royal Wedding

The Royal wedding between Prince Harry and Meghan Markle took place on Saturday as the world watched in awe. To be exact I must’ve watched at least 4 times, it was magical *insert heart eye emoji*.

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Meghan Markle and Prince Harry exchanged vows in front of their 600 guest at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle. Over 100,000 spectators stood around the grounds of the chapel and over 2 million people watched from the comfort of their home via youtube.

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The part of the wedding I enjoyed the most was the integration of  cultures. How Meghan flawlessly added her cultural touches on her royal wedding. I’ll admit prior to watching I was a bit uninterested simply because I wasn’t sure if the wedding would reflect her culture and heritage. To my surprise it definitely did. Listed below are 5 touches of black culture that added the perfect amount of ‘sauce’ on the royal wedding which kept me and many others interested.

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Doria Ragland – Meghan Markle’s mother is the ultimate touch of black culture. The elegance and grace that radiated from this woman was amazing. From her beautifully tied back locs to her poise and regal demeanor its a surprise she hasn’t already descended from royalty, she’s a natural. I’m sure for Meghan to look over and see her mom sitting and watching her take her vows made her feel right at home.

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The Gospel Choir – During their wedding reception the audience and royal couple were serenaded by Karen Gibson and The Kingdom Choir. They sung the r&b song ‘Stand By Me’ in perfect pitch as the women were dressed in beautiful pastel ensembles. While the men of the choir matched their fly with pastel ties.

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Bishop Michael Curry – Oh yes the sermon given by Bishop Michael Curry made me feel right at home, I’m sure Markle felt the same. His sermon was excellent but it was definitely lengthy like many African American preachers I know who have no concept of time. That is the beauty of the ‘black church‘, it becomes so personal, where members treat one another like family, and getting the word across becomes first priority while timing becomes second or sometimes third. Bishop Curry’s sermon was entitled “We must discover the power of love” was beautiful, and spoke to the truth of Meghan and Harry’s relationship. Basically explaining how love conquers all. During his sermon Curry cited quotes from Martin Luther King Jr.  Prince Harry dropped a few tears while listening.

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Sheku Kanneh-Mason – 19 year old Cellist traveled to perform at the royal wedding after receiving a personal phone call from the Dutchess Meghan Markle herself requesting his presence and musical ability at their ceremony. This was not Sheku’s first time performing for Prince Harry. Back in 2017 he performed at a charity event for the Prince. Sheku was also named musician of the year in 2016 by BBC. Seeing this young African American man on stage with a fresh shape up carrying out classical selections from his cello made me so proud. Kanneh-Mason’s performance was amazing. Side bar: We need instrumental music taught in public schools again

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The black excellent celebrities in attendance – The royal wedding was dripping with black excellence. Aside from Meghan Markle herself there were a handful of other key players in black culture within attendance. Oprah Winfrey attended, along with Meghan’s close friend and history making U.S. tennis player Serena Williams. Idris Elba was also spotted along with his fiance Sabrina Dowhre.

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